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Clarke University Summer Scholarly Projects

Apply by May 1!

Selected applicants will be invited by May 15th, and will have until May 31st to accept or decline the offer.

There is no cost for participation in the Summer Scholarly Projects.

 

Application Form

The 2019 Clarke University Summer Scholarly Projects are designed to expose high achieving junior and senior high school students to the world of scholarly engagement with faculty in respective areas of expertise.

Students will be able to work one-on-one or in a small group with other high school and Clarke University students with faculty guidance and engagement on a scholarly project. Academic areas of interest are Biology, Computer Information Systems, and Music.

Participants must be entering junior or senior high school in fall 2019.

Investigation of the Neurotoxic and Neuroprotective Effects of Consumable Substances in Normal and Neurodegenerative Disease Models

June 12-21
(Up to two high school students will be chosen)
9 a.m. – Noon in a research laboratory at Clarke University
Cost: FREE

Neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s are a growing problem in the United States, as disability and morality attributed to these two disorders continues to increase. The causes of these diseases are complex and multifactorial, as both have been linked to genetic and environmental factors. Substances that may impact the onset and progression of these neurodegenerative disorders have been investigated, however direct evidence of the effects of these compounds on neurons is lacking. This project will investigate the effects of consumable substances on the structure, function and survival of neurons using the soil dwelling worm Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), which serves as a model for human disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

Must be an entering junior or senior high school student fall 2019.

Applicants are requested to submit an application including a brief statement of interest, and the name and contact information for a current or former teacher to serve as a reference.

Game Development with Virtual Reality

July 15-19
(Up to six high school students will be chosen)
Noon – 4 p.m.
Cost: FREE

Gaming Development with Virtual Reality introduces students to not only video game development but also user experience in virtual reality. The development team will research and identify a theme to rapidly prototype in the field of video games and determine the expected user experience in virtual reality. Upon creating a theme, the team will then utilize the Unity Game Engine to deliver a functioning game. User experience will be tested and adjusted as need be by the development team prior to delivering the final solution.

Students will participate in a one-week experience  whereby they will do sample prototyping, game development, and user experience testing.

Must be an entering junior or senior high school student fall 2019 enrolled in or completed a computer science course if applicable. Interest in art design and/or computer programming is desirable.

Applicants are requested to submit an application including a brief statement of interest.

Altering Gene Expression in Human Ocular Cells

July 15-19
(Up to two high school students will be chosen)
9 a.m. – Noon in the Marie Miske Center for Science Inquiry
Cost: FREE

Glaucoma is a major cause of blindness affecting more than 2 million Americans. Glaucoma associated blindness is often caused by a build-up of fluid pressure within the eye. Therapeutic agents currently used in the management of ocular pressure include drugs, which unfortunately are not fully characterized and have unwanted side effects. The use of small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is a promising alternative for ocular therapy. siRNAs have emerged as an effective means to alter the expression of genes in human cells. As part of this project, students will learn how to culture human eye cells, treat cells with siRNA reagents, and analyze the expression of target genes using microscopic and molecular detection techniques.

Must be an entering junior or senior high school student fall 2019.

Applicants are requested to submit an application including a brief statement of interest, and the name and contact information for a current or former teacher to serve as a reference.

Special Dissection: Human Head and Neck

August 5-9
(Up to four high school students will be chosen)
10 a.m. – Noon
Cost: FREE

Special dissection of the head and neck will be performed in Clarke University’s cadaver lab. Dissection techniques will be taught along with key head and neck structures, including but not limited to the muscles of mastication, branches of the external carotid artery and suprahyoid muscles. Students will participate in an intense week of dissection focusing on the head and neck. Ideally, these prosections involving neck muscles and the muscles of mastication will be used as models in biology anatomy lab classes.

Must be an entering junior or senior high school student fall 2019, and have successfully completed an A&P course in high school. Applicants must also possess a high level of maturity and excellent fine motor skills.

Applicants are requested to submit an application including a brief statement of interest including a letter of recommendation from their high school A&P instructor. Students selected must be willing to follow all lab safety protocols.

Music Theory and Composition

August 5-9
(Up to six high school students will be chosen)
9 a.m. – Noon
Cost: FREE

Creativity and the arts are rapidly being added to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) creating STEAM. It is now being recognized that skill without imagination and creativity leaves a void in a student’s skill set, employability and leadership ability. Music composition is a field that joins skill (music theory, orchestration and arranging) and technology (computers, software and audio equipment) with creativity.

Students will participate in a week-long seminar. They will compose works for Clarke University faculty and students to perform on a September recital with guest artists (students, faculty, alumni, friends and former students) as available. Students will complete one work for performance on a September public recital.

Must be an entering junior or senior high school student fall 2019 with music interest and experience.

Applicants are requested to submit an application including a brief statement of interest.